Tag Archives: half-marathon

Runners Wanted: “Next Level” Training for 5K and Beyond

“I feel the need, the need for speed!”  — Maverick & Goose [Top Gun]

I mentioned a while back that I wanted to write my 3rd place in 1 mile 7 1 2014next running book about how to attain the next level.  I want to answer the question:  “When you have reached a plateau, how do you break through to faster personal records?”  I have done a lot of reading and a lot of experimenting over the last year.  Not everything has worked out… BUT, I think I have finally found a combination of research-based techniques that will do it.  This combination will bring runners to the next level!

Is this a magical elixir?  

It is certainly not magical and it is not a quick-fix.  It requires hard work and a precise combination of specialized training.  In other words, you can’t just go run whatever you want.  You also can’t skip days or change workouts based on how you feel.

What kind of workouts will it include?

My “Next Level” training for breaking plateaus is a combination of 4 types of workouts.  Each of the four workouts have a very specific set of purposes.  Each of the four workouts have been proven to be effective for those purposes.  What is truly new about my program is the combination of the workouts.  In his book Running Science, Dr. Owen Anderson identifies 7 variables that impact running performance:

  • Maximal aerobic capacity (VO2 Max or VDOT)
  • Running Economy
  • Minimum velocity for maximal aerobic capacity (vVo2 Max or vVDOT)
  • Velocity at lactate threshold
  • Maximal running speed
  • Resistance to fatigue
  • Running-specific strength

Of course the variables overlap, with each one affecting several if not all of the other factors.  Still, any balanced approach to enhancing your performance in running must account for all seven.  If you design separate workouts for each variable, you would not have enough time or energy to get them all done and see the changes you are seeking.  Hence, the real trick is in finding specific workouts that lead to significant positive changes in several of these variables.  For the purposes of the Next Level training system, we will call these types of workouts “Super-Workouts” because they do super things for several of the variables.  Like superfoods, superworkouts are powerful.  The right combination will make you much more fit and help you break through to the next level.

Runners Wanted

Before I publish that next book and share the specifics of this new system of training, I need to assemble a group of 20 runners who want to try out my Next-Level Training System.  Interested runners would hire me as their coach for the next few months, following the fee structure outline on my coaching page.  We would start by discussing the specifics about your current level of training and performance.  I would then tailor the Next Level Training System to your specific needs in terms of your paces, goals, and lifestyle.  Then we would closely track your progress and tweak the program as needed.  Runners that stick to the program will then be featured in the book about the Next Level Training System.

Eligibility:  Are you ready to go to the next level?

Runners at all levels are welcome to participate as long as you are willing to stick with the program for at least 8 weeks.  16 weeks is preferred but not required.

Reply Now by emailing me your request to participate.  I will take the first 20 runners regardless of current performance level.  Send me a message as soon as possible to make sure you are included.

“Train smart, eat well, & enjoy the run!”  — P. Mark Taylor

 

Keeping Things in Perspective: Down, But Not Out

“On your worst day of running, you still inspire someone.”  This is what I remind myself when I get down.

Unfortunately, I have been down a lot lately.  Just over a year ago, I made a mistake while lifting weights.  I hurt my knees.  I ran the Secret City Half Marathon last year on hurting knees, but then I took almost the entire month of December 2013 off to allow my knees to recover.  2013 had been a year full of personal records.  I was up, up, up and flying high.  I was strong and fast.

secret city 2013I entered 2014 by racing a 5K on New Year’s Day that was considerably slower than my recent 5Ks.  This was not a big surprise since had just taken a month off.  What did surprise me was that it would take me a full year to get back to the shape I had been in before the knee incident.  I suppose that bike wreck and concussion in February didn’t do me much good either.

I trained hard and fast.  I took breaks after the longest races.  I did many things right.  Still, I have been plagued with “bad days” time and time again in 2014.  At my first Boston Marathon, I struggled very early.  I started out as planned, but got slower every mile.  I finished nearly 2 hours slower than my goal and required medical attention.

I focused on shorter distances in the summer more than ever before.  Still, I fell short on the personal records set in 2013.  I was getting closer as I went into fall, but my fall marathon had the same difficulties I had experienced a couple of years ago.  I struggled to maintain pace after the half way mark and gradually faded.  I managed to qualify for Boston 2016, but just barely.  I finished about 10 minutes slower than I had in both of my marathons in 2013.

The only course PR that I set this year was at the Townsend 15K.  I believed I had finally gotten my speed back by the end of November 2014.  I was training very well.  I expected to compete for a PR or come very close at the Secret City Half Marathon in 2014.  Unfortunately, I was ill on that day.  I was nauseous on the way to the race.  I tried to ignore that and started the race as I had planned.  I was fine until mile 4.  I slowed from 6:28 in miles 2 and 3 to a 7:30 in mile 4.  I considered stopping.  I considered puking, thinking I would probably feel better if I could let it out.  I decided to press on and make the best of it.  I pushed myself as hard as I could.  I managed to squeak out a 7:00 average pace by the end of the half marathon.  It was not race-day jitters.  I was ill for the next 36 hours.

I am frustrated.  I am as fast as I have ever been, but I just can’t seem to show it.  Staying positive is the only defense against such thoughts.

  • I am grateful that my knees did recover.
  • I am grateful that I survived the bike wreck (car involved) without anything but a concussion.
  • I am grateful that I have made a strong comeback, even if I have not shown it in a race just yet.
  • I am grateful that I have a loving wife who is patient with me as I go through all of these struggles.

Not everyone has these things.
I am privileged.
I am blessed.

I am frustrated, but I will not give up.  My training is working.  I am enjoying running.  I can’t let performance on race-day detract from that.

“On your worst day of running, you still inspire someone.” This is what I remind myself when I get down.  That is when I find the strength to stop the pity party and keep running.  They are my legs.  It is my effort.  It is my time.  Still, it’s not all about me.  That makes it worth the effort no matter how I do.

 

“Train smart, eat well, & enjoy the run!”

– P. Mark Taylor

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Check out these books by P. Mark Taylor for more advice on running:

The Gift of Running: A Book for Runners & Future Runners Wise Running Book COVER mockup

&

Wise Running: Thoughts on Running and Life

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Wise Running Shirts & More

Find yours HERE:

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My Unreasonable Running Goals for the Next 5 Years (don’t judge me)

These are running goals I would like to accomplish within 5 years.

No, they are not reasonable for my current level of fitness.

This is my dream.

Encourage me or keep it to yourself.

Thanks,

P. Mark Taylor

Distance  

Goal Time

   Why

400 meters

0:54

   Training for the 800

800 meters

1:58

   US record for 50-54 age group

Mile

4:29

   Because it is faster than 4:30  ;)

5K

15:12

   Training for 1/2

10K

31:35

   Training for 1/2

½ Marathon   

1:10:25

   This is my main goal.

Marathon

Sub 3

   At Boston.  Pride mostly.  :)

Wise Running: Thoughts on Running and Life (2nd book)

Wise Running Book 2 is now available via in paperback and e-book. 

Wise Running Book COVER mockup

Wise Running is the follow-up to P. Mark Taylor’s first book on running: The Gift of Running.  While the first book focused more on getting started as a runner, this second book is more about how to move to the next level. P. Mark Taylor tells us how to think about running in ways that will help you be more consistent and improve.

Running is a great metaphor for life. It takes effort. It takes motivation. You have to stay healthy. If you stick with it long
enough and smart enough, you live a more rewarding life. So it is with running.

In Wise Running, P. Mark Taylor shows runners how to train smart, eat well, and enjoy the run.

The ebook includes:

  • goals, fitness, & health
  • how to think about training
  • designing a race and training schedule
  • aligning your efforts with reality
  • eating for health and fitness
  • a runner’s view on special diets
  • running-specific nutrition, including marathon nutrition
  • the effects of heat and humidity
  • the social aspect of running
  • motivation and encouragement

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The Gift of Running, the first book in the Wise Running series by P. Mark Taylor, is available in both paperback & e-book

 

Wise Running: More on Motivation

I recently posted a blog about motivation, an excerpt from my 2nd book about to be published.

http://wiserunning.com/2013/07/27/wise-running-models-of-motivation/

 

Today’s post adds a little and is a response to the requests of two fledgling runners that are trying to find the motivation to be more consistent.

A few questions to ask yourself:

  • What is the purpose and role of running in your life?
  • Why did you start?
  • Why do you continue?

When you have answered these questions, write the answers down and post it on the wall.  When it is time to go for a run, read these before you decide whether you will run or not.

The second thing that I want to share is consistency leads to rewards.

Remember This:

If you run consistently, running will reward you with endorphins, health, the satisfaction of meeting goals, and connections to a network of positive people.

If you only run once in a while, running most often feels like a punishment.

 

The final thing to add is a quick note about runners high.  It is an awesome feeling that is different from a rush of endorphins.  Running becomes easy and you feel very relaxed and happy while you run.

The more consistent you are with your running, the more likely it is that you will experience runners high.

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Now it is time for our fellow runners to share!

  • What benefits do you get from running more consistently?
  • What tips would you give to runners to help them become more consistent?

Post your response in the comments below.  Thank you!!

Train smart, eat well, and enjoy the run!

P. Mark Taylor

wise running logo 7_25_12

My Running Form: In Pictures 7/25/2013

 

running form 7_25_2013

Chasing a Seventeen-Year-Old Me (updated 7/31/2013)

“Goals are not only absolutely necessary to motivate us.  They are essential to really keep us alive.”  — — Robert Schuller

‎”You can’t wait for inspiration. You have to go after it with a club.” ~Jack London
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Call it a mid-life crisis.  Call it dreaming.  Call it whatever you want.  I am chasing the shadow of a 17 year-old me.  I was 17 when I consistently ran 4:45 for 1600 meters.  I was 17 when I ran a half-marathon in 1:20:48.  I was 17 when I got tendinitis.  After a couple of years of doctors, specialists, & physical therapy, nobody could figure out why I had this tendinitis.  I would run once in a while, but my competitive days were done… or so I thought.
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My tendinitis issues started in 1984.  Now fast forward to 2003.  I decided that I was getting out of shape and I started jogging.  This time, my tendinitis did not show up but I had knee issues.  Another specialist and another round of, “There is nothing we can do.”  I was told to stay off hills and run 3 miles or less.  So for a few years I jogged 3 to 7 miles on a feel-like-it basis.
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When my life was turned inside out back in 2009, I really needed stress relief badly, so I turned to fitness.  I joined a gym and started training for a marathon.  Well, I should say that I started running a lot and hoping that would help me finish a marathon.  I can’t really say that I had a plan.  In the 2010 Knoxville Marathon, I totally bonked at mile 17 and walked the rest of the way…mostly in the cold rain…shivering..muscles locked up… but I finished.  5 hours and 35 minutes.  It was hell.  I was hooked!
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I put the weights down and focused on training for the 2011 Knoxville Marathon.  This time, I followed one of Hal Higdon’s plans.  I modified the advanced I plan.  I also learned about electrolytes and Yasso 800s.  I felt fast enough to run 3:40 or so, but alas I had still not learned enough about electrolytes and nutrition.  I had to settle for 3 hours and 55 minutes.  Much better than the first try!
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After this one, I followed Hal’s advice and used the momentum from this marathon to earn some personal records (PRs) in shorter distances.  He was SO right.  I had done very little speed training.  Most of my track work was about pacing more than speed.  Still, my training had made me much faster.  I found myself running a 5k in less than a 7 minute pace for the first time in over a quarter of a century!  A month later, I averaged a 7 minute pace for a 10k!
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“What else can I accomplish?” This was the question That I asked myself.  Moreover, “What do I WANT to accomplish while I am still young enough to get fast?”
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I set my sights on a 6 minute mile.  In the next 5k, I ran the first mile in 5:47.  I obviously couldn’t maintain that speed, but it was my first sub-6 mile in a very long time.  I ended up finishing the 5k in 20:46.  I kept pondering…”How fast can I get?”
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I am now 46 years old and I have qualified for the Boston Marathon twice.  At this point I know that I can run a sub-3-hour marathon somewhere in the next year or so.  It may not be on the next race, but it will happen.  :)
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Qualifying for Boston was just bucket list item #1.  Also on my bucket list:

  • Run 1 mile in 4:30.  (I may or may not make it, but it is worth a shot.)
  • Run a 5k in 16 minutes. (If I can even just get close to the first one, I have a shot at this)
  • Run a half marathon in less than 1 hour and 20 minutes  ( I can probably make it faster, but this specific time would be enough to defeat the 17 year old me)
What I am not doing is setting time limits.  I obviously can’t wait forever, but injuries/mishaps will occur along the way.  I have to give myself that latitude or I will go crazy.  I set goals and display them publicly to push myself, but I want to enjoy the ride.
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UPDATE – As of 7/31/2013, my current PRs are:
Mile  5:23
5K   18:35
Half Marathon  1:27:42
  Marathon  3:13:22
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I am chasing the shadow of a 17 year-old me…
I am finally getting close enough to see him…
and I think I can pass him before this race is over!
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Happy Running!

The Pieces of the Running Puzzle

The following is an excerpt from my new book, Wise Running: Thoughts on Running and Life, which is scheduled to be released in August 2013.

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Going out for a run is good enough if your goal is to run. If your goal is to run over one mile quickly, however, there is a lot more to it. In the old days, they just worried about two things: speed and endurance. This, too, is oversimplified. The goal of this chapter is to give you an overview of what you really need to know in order to make informed decisions about training for any distance from a mile to a marathon.

The following framework is offered as a way to think about your training. There are much more technical ways of looking at running. Later in this book I have included a list of suggested readings if you want to know more of the details. In my own thinking, however, this is as complex it needs to be for effective training. I think about it in these three categories:

  1. Raw Speed & Power
  2. Short-Term Endurance
  3. Long term Endurance

Here is a brief description of each:

Raw Speed & Power

Raw speed and power is just as it sounds. Go out to a track and run 50 or 100 meters as fast as you can. For this kind of running, you are in the anaerobic zone. Literally, you are not breathing enough oxygen to provide enough energy using the aerobic metabolism. Your body shifts into anaerobic metabolism. The pace at which this occurs is called the anaerobic threshold. While this requires less oxygen, it also requires a lot more fuel. You burn out quickly, so you can only do this for very short distances. Even so, raw speed and power workouts are an important part of the foundation for training for races at any distance from 400 meters to the marathon!

woman running on trackTraining for raw speed and power takes repeats. Doing these sprints at distances from 100 meters up to 400 meters can build muscle and change your anaerobic threshold for the better. In order to add even more muscle, I also add natural power-building exercises after my repeats workout. I include things like power-skipping, hopping, jumping, walking lunges, and crossover running drills.

I do not recommend doing this raw speed and power workout more than once a week. It takes a long time to heal from these extreme workouts. In most marathon training schedules, raw speed and power workouts are limited to the first 1/2 or less of the training schedule.

Short-Term Endurance

When I speak of short-term endurance, I am referring to distances of 800 meters up to a mile or even two. These are distances at which you are not likely to cross the anaerobic threshold, but you are likely to cross another important line: the lactate threshold. While the anaerobic threshold is about the consumption of oxygen, the lactate threshold is about the buildup of lactate in your muscles. Lactate is not only a natural byproduct of the aerobic metabolism happening in your muscles but it is also fuel. Your muscles can recycle this byproduct and consume it as a secondary source of fuel. As such, lactate is good. The bad part is that your body is limited as to how fast this recycling occurs. When the muscles produce more lactate than they can burn, this leads to cramping. This cramping can slow you down or even injure you. Hence, you need workouts specifically designed to challenge your body to become more efficient. More efficiency in these processes means that you can run a faster pace without cramping from lactate buildup.

Training for short-term endurance takes interval training. There are several types of interval training, but they all have the same goal: being able to run faster before hitting your lactate threshold. Interval training methods also have the same characteristics in terms of how they challenge your body to be more efficient with lactate. It is simply alternating between paces: running a little faster than your lactate threshold pace and then switching to a little slower than lactate threshold to allow your body to catch up. Then without stopping, you accelerate to the faster pace again. This fast/slow sequence is done throughout the intervals workout to cue the body that it needs to change to adapt to faster running. As with speed and power workouts, doing interval training once a week is enough for almost any runner.

Long-Term Endurance

When you run significantly slower than your lactate threshold pace, you should be able to maintain that pace for a long way. Many of us might have enough glycogen stored in our bodies to run as far as a half marathon with no additional fuel. That does not mean, however, that your body can manage any distance just by training for those other levels. It does make it easier, but you still have to train for what you want to race.

If you want to race farther than two miles, you must train for the distance. In order to hold your newly enhanced faster paces for longer distances, you must practice two types of runs: tempo runs and long runs. A tempo run is simply running a fairly fast pace (but slower than lactate threshold) for a longer distance. You can do a tempo run that takes anywhere from 20 minutes up to an hour. A long run, however, is just that. You run much slower than lactate threshold pace, but you do it for a much longer distance. A long run can be anywhere from an hour to three hours. Both of these types of long-term endurance runs cue the body to develop more in ways that support more efficient oxygen and fuel delivery, more efficient metabolism, and more efficient lactate clearance. In addition, the longer runs do more to build and develop mitochondria which allow you to burn body fat more efficiently.

** Note for Marathoners: Research shows that no significant gain comes from running a long run beyond three hours. No matter what distance that is for you, I do not recommend running longer than three hours during training.

If you are going to develop a training plan for whatever goal you have in distance running, you will need to consider these three areas.

Train smart, eat well, and enjoy the run!

wise running logo 7_25_12

Running 101: Why Training Is More Important Than Racing

“The will to win means nothing without the will to prepare.” – Juma Ikangaa

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When you begin a discussion about running, the conversation frequently centers on races:

  • What is PR?
  • When is your next race?

Even when training is mentioned, it is used as context for a question about racing?

  • What are you training for?

This might just be my opinion, but I think discussions like this show that runners are missing the point.  Training is infinitely more important than racing.  Yes, racing can be a motivator, but this is being results-driven.  We begin to judge ourselves, and sometimes others, by the results they produce on race-day.  There is a small segment of the population for whom this is the best way to go.  They thrive on the pressure.  For the vast majority of the population of runners, however, this focus on race results can be very unhealthy.  It can be a source of great frustration, fear, and angst.

Don’t get me wrong, I am training for particular races throughout the year.  I plan my schedule around them.  It is merely a difference of perspective.

The bottom line is this:

Your running performance on race day is merely a reflection of the progress you have made in training over the previous weeks and months.

If you do not train, you will most likely be disappointed with the results.  If you trained poorly or inconsistently, disappointment is also likely.  If you train wisely and consistently, you are more likely to be happy with the results.  On the other hand, with great training you can still be disappointed on race day.  Even though you may have stuck to a perfectly designing training schedule, there are many things that can go wrong on race day:

  • the weather can always affect your results on race day
  • bad sushi or an unplanned illness can steal your power or keep you from the starting line
  • mother nature’s monthly gift could arrive on the wrong day
  • you could slip and fall

0001[1]The list goes on and on.  With so many things that could happen on race day, it seems folly to derive your worth, competence, & happiness as a runner primarily from what happens on race days.

Training, on the other hand, has a lot more days to choose from.  Instead of having certain days where I determine the progress I have made, I can wait until I have a good day.  For example, if I am feeling really great about a set of 800 meter intervals that I just completed, I will choose that day to measure my progress.  I will go home and get on my computer to look up the equivalent workout from a year before and sometimes even further back.  In that situation, I am not depending on weather or luck.  I can compare a good day to a good day and see my true progress.

So here it is.  If you succeed on race day, it is because of your training days.  If you fail on race day, you can still see progress using your everyday workout.

There are a lot more opportunities to find success if you focus on your training rather than your races.  Once I finally came to this realization,  it freed me up to enjoy my races much more. 

I no longer put undue pressure on myself to have a good day on that particular day.  I have learned to plan the first miles of a race and then run by feel the rest of the way.  I can simply be happy with doing my best that day because I know that races are not the true measure of my progress.

Train smart, eat well, and enjoy the run!

wise running logo 7_25_12

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My Personal Running Progress Since 2009

This post is not advice.  It is just a personal report of the progress that I have made over the last 4 years.

In the summer of 2009, my life was hitting some speed bumps [understatement].  To deal with the added stress, I hit the road running.  At first I just ran a few miles every two or three days.  I just ran when I felt like it.  I ran down backwoods country roads in the hot summer and it felt good.  I had given up competitive running back in 1985 because of some tendon issues that went unresolved.  Yet, here I was.  I was running… and running felt good.

Barely moving at the end of the Oak Rige Half Marathon, 2009

Barely moving at the end of the Oak Ridge Half Marathon, 2009

By the end of the summer, I decided that I would run a half marathon.  I was enjoying longer and longer runs and it just sounded good.  Besides, in 1984 I ran a half marathon in 1:20:48.  How hard could it be to get it back, right?  WRONG!

I continued to run erratically.  I had no plan.  I just ran what I felt like running.  The Oak Ridge Half Marathon was in November that year.  I had run a lot, or so I thought.  On race day, I felt strong and went out waaaay too fast.  By the half way point, I was quite tired.  Then came the killer hill.  By the time I came down that hill my pride was completely gone.  All I had to do is just survive the next 6 miles.  Survive I did.  Barely.  I had started the day in a sprint and ended barely moving.  Everything hurt.  The world was spinning a little bit.  Man, that was hard!

As tough as it was, I did manage to squeak in just under the two-hour mark.  That performance is roughly the equivalent of running a 26 minute 5K.

But this article is not about how fast I was or am.  It is about my progress and how long it has taken.  Hence that is just the beginning of the story.

Here are my race results

2013 KTC EXPO 10k  – 10K Run TN 5/25/13 1 24 28 6:23 39:43
Covenant Health Knoxville Half Marathon 2013 TN 4/7/13 3 49 57 6:55 1:30:41
Shamrock Marathon  2013 VA 3/16/13 13 107 121 7:22 3:13:22
Whitestone 30k TN 2/24/13 2 6 7 7:17 2:16:02
Strawberry Plains Half Marathon 2013 TN 2/9/13 5 12 14 6:41 1:27:42
Calhoun’s New Year’s Day 5K 2013 TN 1/1/13 1 19 20 5:58 18:35
Secret City Half Marathon  2012 TN 11/18/12 10 10 10 6:46 1:28:41
7 Bridges Marathon 2012 TN 10/21/12 22 22 22 7:44 3:22:44
THE HAL CANFIELD  5 MILE 2012 – Run-5Mi TN 9/3/12 2 9 12 7:06 35:33
THE HAL CANFIELD MEMORIAL MILE 2012 – Run-1Mi TN 9/3/12 3 23 26 5:43 05:43.00
The Butterfly Fund of East Tennessee 5K TN 8/18/12 2 14 17 6:31 20:14
29th Annual Carter Mill 10k 2012 TN 7/21/12 2 24 30 7:11 44:39
Pilot’s Fireball Classic 5K TN 7/3/12 5 78 89 6:36 20:31
Summer Solstice 8K TN 6/16/12 3 32 38 8:18 41:20
8th Annual Provision Health & Wellness Dogwood Classic 5k 2012 TN 4/28/12 4 24 24 6:10 19:11
Covenant Health Dogwood Mile 2012 TN 4/27/12 1 6 6 5:34 05:34.00
Strawberry Plains Half Marathon 2012 TN 2/11/12 3 20 22 7:01 1:32:01
New Year’s Day 5K 2012 TN 1/1/12 6 39 45 6:23 19:52
Secret City Half Marathon  2011 TN 11/20/11 4 22 26 7:08 1:33:31
Seven Bridges Marathon 2011 TN 10/16/11 5 19 20 7:55 3:27:27
27TH ANNUAL PILOT FIREBALL MOONLIGHT CLASSIC 5K RUN/WALK TN 7/3/11 3 80 88 6:39 20:41
34th Annual KTC EXPO 10K 2011
TN 5/28/11 6 40 45 6:56 43:09
Covenant Health Knoxville Marathon 2011 TN 4/3/11 24 152 187 9:00 3:55:59
Secret City Half Marathon TN 11/21/10 6 47 66 8:18 1:48:53
Tennessee Sports Medicine Expo 5k 2010 TN 5/29/10 5 24 25 7:03 21:55
Covenant Health Knoxville Marathon 2010 TN 3/28/10 62 330 479 12:46 5:34:38
Oak Ridge Half Marathon 2009 TN 11/21/09 7 87 112 9:07 1:59:27

If we just compare the half marathon from 2009 [1:59:27] to my PR in 2012 [1:27:42], then here is the progress:

  • 31 minutes and 45 seconds faster overall for the half marathon distance.
  • 2 minutes and 26 seconds faster pace per mile
  • VDOT score estimates went from 36.5 to 52.5

This 16 VDOT point progress was made in approximately 42 months.  Hence, I advanced about almost 4/10 of a VDOT point per month.  Considering that I was ill for 6 moths last year, that is pretty fast progress!  Under absolutely ideal conditions that none of us have, you could expect to progress at about .8 VDOT points per month.  Moreover, the pace per mile for the half marathon pace changed about 3.5 to 4 seconds per month of diligent labor.

If we only look at 5K races, then I ran a 21:55 in May of 2010 and a PR of 18:35 in January of 2013.  Here is the progress:

  • 3 minutes and 40 seconds faster over the 5K distance
  • 1 minute and 5 seconds faster pace per mile
  • VDOT score estimates of 45 to 54

Since this improvement happened over 32 months, that would be nearly 3/10 of a VDOT point per month average.  Moreover, the pace per mile changed about 2 seconds per month of diligent labor.

To Sum It Up

Over the last few years, my average progress for each month of training has been:

  • about 2 seconds faster pace for a 5K
  • about 3.75 seconds faster pace for a half marathon

“Train smart, eat well, & enjoy the run!”  — P. Mark Taylor

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Check out these books by P. Mark Taylor for more advice on running:

 

The Gift of Running: A Book for Runners & future runners  Wise Running Book COVER mockup

&

Wise Running: Thoughts on Running and Life